Featured Articles

Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple has finally unveiled its eagerly awaited smartwatch and surprisingly it has dropped the "i" from the brand, calling it simply…

More...
Skylake 14nm announced

Skylake 14nm announced

Kirk B. Skaugen, Senior Vice President General Manager, PC Client Group has showcased Skylake, Intel’s second generation 14nm architecture.

More...
Apple officially announces 4.7-inch iPhone 6 and 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus

Apple officially announces 4.7-inch iPhone 6 and 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus

The day has finally come and it appears that most rumors were actually spot on as Apple has now officially unveiled…

More...
CEO: Intel on target for 40m tablets

CEO: Intel on target for 40m tablets

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich just kicked off the IDF 2014 keynote and it started with a phone avatar, some Katy Perry…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 12 September 2007 07:18

Supercomputer helps improve storm forecasting

Written by David Stellmack

Image

Focus on individual storm cells


 

Although official weather records have been recorded for at least the past 150 years, weather prediction for thunderstorm activity is still not that reliable. 

The University of Oklahoma’s Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms (CAPS) has team up with the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) using an IBM Cray supercomputer at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to improve weather forecasting of storms by using supercomputer analyses of the individual cells that are part of tornadoes and severe thunderstorms.

Numerical weather predictions are not precise because of the reliance on storm geographical areas of 10 Km or larger, which provides only a coarse resolution of storm activity. Focusing on individual cells and using a supercomputer for computational analysis of these thousands of cells gives a more precise analysis of the storm’s intensity.

CAPS and NOAA are using the Cray XT supercomputer to analyze 2-Km geographical areas in various areas of the U.S. by running ten models for “ensemble forecasting” to help eliminate errors and ensure more accurate data collection. The data is being collected and archived at the National Weather Center in Norman, Oklahoma.

Read more here.

Last modified on Wednesday, 12 September 2007 10:42

David Stellmack

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments