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Tuesday, 03 April 2007 16:09

Software turns single core into multi-core

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Israeli development


An Israeli company has developed software which it claims has the effect of turning a single core chip into a multi-core.

According to Mplicity's site here its product CoreUpGrade and is independent of processor architecture.

As an example it takes a single-core ARC625D from ARC capable of performing at a 270-MHz clock frequency and transformed it into a dual-core processor capable of performing at 237-MHz clock frequency across the two cores. The "dualised" ARC625D is a cycle-by-cycle compatible component which can be integrated with standard EDA tools and fab processes.

 
The start-up is aiming its product at computer intensive market segments that use large amounts of repetitive logic or face footprint or system power constraints.

 

More here.


Last modified on Tuesday, 03 April 2007 10:19
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