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Friday, 30 March 2007 16:53

Filters could provide new spectrum

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Metamaterial clears radiation

 

A "metamaterial" that filters terahertz radiation could open up new spectrums for wireless communication.

 

According to New Scientist, The new apparatus, developed by researchers at the University of Utah have worked out a way of using terahertz waves for communications.

The device is a sheet of metal foil using a carefully designed pattern of holes that interacts with electromagnetic waves in novel ways, thanks to

sub-wavelength structural features.

The filter is a first step towards developing a terahertz communications system. If the system is developed it will only work over relatively short distances, like a computer network, as the waves are absorbed by moisture in the atmosphere over longer distances.

They believe that it will be five years before any complete system can be developed.

More here-

 

 

           

 

Last modified on Friday, 30 March 2007 16:54

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