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Wednesday, 04 April 2007 11:08

Microsoft sued over Vista

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Colluded with PC makers

 

Microsoft has been sued for allowing PC makers promote computers as "Windows Vista Capable". A proposed class action which was filed on behalf of Dianne Kelley in the US, claims that Microsoft colluded with computer makers.


Attempting to avoid a drop in PC sales late last year, Microsoft embarked on a campaign of assuring consumers that the machines they were buying could run Vista in January.

However, machines marked with "Windows Vista Capable" stickers only met the requirements for Windows Vista Home Basic which could not handle anything that Microsoft was advertising.


Windows Vista Capable could not handle the Media Centre PC interface, Flip 3D window-switching. Kelly claims that she was deceived into thinking that the logo on the machine meant she could run all the features Microsoft was touting as capabilities of Windows Vista.


A Microsoft spokesman said that the suit wrongly overlooked its efforts to make clear the differences between the different versions.

More here.


Last modified on Wednesday, 04 April 2007 13:04

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