Error
  • JUser::_load: Unable to load user with id: 67

Featured Articles

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel has released a 3G cellular modem with an integrated power amplifier that fits into a 300 mm2 footprint, claiming it…

More...
Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

It's not all rosy in the house of Intel. It seems that upcoming Atom out-of-order cores might be giving this semiconductor…

More...
TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC will start producing 16nm wafers in the first quarter of 2015. Sometime in the second quarter production should ramp up…

More...
Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S is the ‘tock’ of the Haswell architecture and despite being delayed from the original plan, this desktop part is scheduled…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 05 October 2007 10:42

Mission impossible messaging possible

Written by

Image

Invisible ink

 

Scientists have developed self-destructing messages using printer ink that vanishes after 24 hours.

When the document is printed on the reusable paper, it appears in a shade of dark purple however it fades until it has gone completely. The Scientists hope that the technique will reduce the trillion pages put in the recycling bin soon after being printed each year.

According to a press release from Xerox, the ink is a temporary discolouration of light-sensitive molecules known as photochromes. The paper is coated with photochromes, which change colour when they are exposed to ultraviolet light. Whe the printing is finished, the molecules begin reacting to the warmth in the surrounding air and gradually return to their natural state.

So long as it is not creased, the paper can be used up to 30 times.

More here.

Last modified on Friday, 05 October 2007 10:46

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments