Featured Articles

AMD sheds light on stacked DRAM APUs

AMD sheds light on stacked DRAM APUs

AMD is fast tracking stacked DRAM deployment and a new presentation leaked by the company  points to APUs with stacked DRAM,…

More...
Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

As expected and reported earlier, Nvidia has now officially announced its newest Shield device, the new 8-inch Shield Tablet. While the…

More...
Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel launches new mobile Haswell and Bay Trail parts

Intel has introduced seven new Haswell mobile parts and four Bay Trail SoC chips, but most of them are merely clock…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU reviewed

Today we'll take a closer look at AMD's A8-7600 APU Kaveri APU, more specifically we'll examine the GPU performance you can…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 05 December 2008 10:56

Kingston launches DDR3 HyperX notebook memory

Written by test

Image

Low latency modules

Kingston has announced its first DDR3 HyperX notebook SO-DIMM modules, the KHX8500S3ULK2/4G, which is a kit that consists of two 2GB modules. The modules come fitted with Kingston's blue HyperX heat spreaders, although we're not sure how much of a difference it'll make inside a notebook, as there won't be a lot of airflow around the memory modules.

The clock speed of the modules is 1,066MHz or PC8500, but what sets these modules apart is the low latency of 5-5-5-15 at 1.5V, which is far superior to any DDR3 SO-DIMMs on the market. However, you'll need a notebook which allows you to adjust the memory timing this low to be able to see any benefit from the lower latency, as well as the higher clock speed of the modules.

The MSRP for the kit is US$228 (€179/£155), which isn't exactly cheap, but with limited choice, these are the modules to go for if your notebook supports them and you're keen on trying to squeeze every bit of performance you possible can out of it.

You can find the press release here
Last modified on Saturday, 06 December 2008 06:48
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments