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Wednesday, 03 December 2008 13:25

Intel's 80GB SSD "sinks" to $525

Written by Fuad Abazovic

Image

Extreme performance unit coming


Intel
has decided to slightly reduce its NAND prices, but its SSD drives are still insanely expensive. In November, Intel was selling its X18-M 80GB, an 1.8-inch drive and X25-M 80GB, an 2.5-inch drive, for $600; and as of the first days of December both drives will be selling for $525 each.


The company is about to introduce the new drive called X25-E 32GB. This is a 2.5-inch drive and this one will start selling for $700.  On the last days of December it will drop down to $575 to meet the price drop of many Core 2-based notebook CPUs. The 64GB version of the same drive will launch in 2009 at a higher price. The M series should fit in mainstream notebooks, while E series should bring extreme performance.

X25-E should be able to support a sustained read at 240MB/s and insanely fast write of 170MB/s, while X25-M or X18-M can support 240MB/s read but much slower 70MB/s write, but with average 0.25W when active while X25-E needs ten times more, 2.4W on average. 

They are still insanely expensive and they will be a good alternative to HDDs, once they drop in price at least 10 times from where they are now.  

Last modified on Thursday, 04 December 2008 03:23
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