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Friday, 06 February 2009 07:49

Intel slashes notebook SSD prices by 34%

Written by Jon Worrel


Image

80GB X25-M now $390, more affordable?


Yesterday, Intel
reduced the prices of its solid state disk lineup in response to changing times in the flash memory industry. Currently, the mainstream 80GB X25-M model for notebook PCs has been reduced by 34 percent, bringing it to a more affordable $390. But is this really an affordable price point compared to the continued success of low-cost rotating magnetic hard drives?

According to David Flynn, chief technical officer of solid-state drive company Fusion-io, the fact that "CEs have taken such a nose dive has left a surplus of flash in the market, driving down prices."

In September, Intel introduced its 2.5-inch 80GB X-25M mainstream model for $595 in quantities of 1,000 and its 160GB model in December for $945 in quantities of 1,000. Just recently, the 80GB model dropped to $399, while the 160GB dropped to $800, roughly a 15 percent difference in just two months.

Additionally, the company has revealed the price of its 64GB X25-E, or "Extreme Edition" solid state disk. The model will be priced at $795 in lots of 1,000 units, roughly a 52 percent difference over the 32GB X25-E announced in October. 

However, the 64GB model can already be purchased on Buy.com for a cool $815.92, while the 32GB model can be had for $429.49, both with free shipping if that helps. On another note, both of these drives are based on 50nm SLC ONFI 1.0 NAND flash with 10 parallel channel architecture.

Last modified on Friday, 06 February 2009 08:45
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