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Thursday, 07 January 2010 13:38

Kingston announces 24GB DDR3 kit

Written by Nedim Hadzic

Image

And a 30GB SSD


Kingston has announced a new memory kit and a new Solid State Drive, which funnily enough are pretty close in terms of capacity.

The 24GB DDR3 memory kit for Intel Core i7 platforms features six 4GB modules whereas the Core i5 version comes with 16GB worth of the same 1600MHz DDR3 modules. The pricing for the 24GB kit stands at $1,599 whereas the 16GB kit will set you back $1,065.

Also announced was the new addition to the SSDNow V series of SSDs, and this drive is marketed as a “boot drive”. This 30GB SSD comes with Windows 7 TRIM and will set you back $109. Kingston says that this drive is designed to be used in scenarios where a HDD is present, so that the SSD keeps only the OS and the key applications. The specs list read speeds at 180MB/s and write speeds at 50MB/s.

The aforementioned memory modules have already been toyed with, and you can check out the performance yourself on the videos here.


Last modified on Thursday, 07 January 2010 14:04
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