Error
  • JUser::_load: Unable to load user with id: 80

Featured Articles

TSMC: Volume production of 16nm FinFET in 2H 2015

TSMC: Volume production of 16nm FinFET in 2H 2015

TSMC has announced that it will begin volume production of 16nm FinFET products in the second half of 2015, in late…

More...
AMD misses earnings targets, announces layoffs

AMD misses earnings targets, announces layoffs

AMD has missed earnings targets and is planning a substantial job cuts. The company reported quarterly earnings yesterday and the street is…

More...
Did Google botch the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9?

Did Google botch the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9?

As expected, Google has finally released the eagerly awaited Nexus 6 phablet and its first 64-bit device, the Nexus 9 tablet.

More...
Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 25 October 2007 13:26

Sony Walkman Commercial

Written by

Image

Pretty sound concept


Sony,
in an attempt to promote its WALKMAN brand, has made an astounding TV commercial.

The idea was to record 128 musicians live, with each separate musician being recorded while they play a specific note alone. The musical piece will require precision from the professional cast and intense concentration. Each note will then compile to a complete musical piece and you can go here for a teaser lead up to the groundbreaking commercial. Click here

Image

Sony says this is the first commercial which brings to life the concept of ‘monophony,’ and is obtained by taking a ‘solo riff’ and turning it into an ‘ensemble riff’ by splitting it across a number of musicians.

Image

Hollywood music director, Peter Raeburn, composed a piece of music especially for the project, which was then deconstructed note by note and beat by beat to create music like.no.other., as Sony would say.

Image

Read more about Sony here.
Last modified on Thursday, 25 October 2007 19:48

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments