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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 25 October 2007 13:26

Sony Walkman Commercial

Written by

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Pretty sound concept


Sony,
in an attempt to promote its WALKMAN brand, has made an astounding TV commercial.

The idea was to record 128 musicians live, with each separate musician being recorded while they play a specific note alone. The musical piece will require precision from the professional cast and intense concentration. Each note will then compile to a complete musical piece and you can go here for a teaser lead up to the groundbreaking commercial. Click here

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Sony says this is the first commercial which brings to life the concept of ‘monophony,’ and is obtained by taking a ‘solo riff’ and turning it into an ‘ensemble riff’ by splitting it across a number of musicians.

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Hollywood music director, Peter Raeburn, composed a piece of music especially for the project, which was then deconstructed note by note and beat by beat to create music like.no.other., as Sony would say.

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Read more about Sony here.
Last modified on Thursday, 25 October 2007 19:48

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