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Wednesday, 24 October 2007 12:31

U.S. censorship oppresses Burmese

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Burmese military imports filters from California


The repressive Burmese military used Internet censorship software to crack down on dissidents during the recent uprising in Burma, now known as Myanmar. Due to a loophole in U.S. law it is possible for any U.S. firm to sell Internet filters to Myanmar.

Software by four California companies has ended in un use by oppressive regimes in 24 of 40 countries. Sometimes they are used to filter out porn and viruses, but they are also used to block political and religious content and other similar types of Websites.

Myanmar censored the Internet using software made by Fortinet, although the company claims that it didn't sell its products directly. However, in the official New Light of Myanmar newspaper there was a story covering a ceremony bringing together Burma's prime minister and Benjamin Teh, described as "an official representative of Fortinet."

More here.
Last modified on Wednesday, 24 October 2007 21:12

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