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Thursday, 16 October 2008 10:29

T-Mobile G1 gets reviewed

Written by Nedim Hadzic

ImageImage

Endgadget has the goods

 

Our friends over at Engadget.com have taken the time to review T-Mobile's highly anticipated G1 phone, to see whether this Android-based phone measures up to its competition. It's important to note that this phone has a serious company-powerhouse behind its back, as T-Mobile, HTC and Google joined forces in making it.

The device is a bit retro-looking, resembling more of a palm pilot from a past era, although it’s not too bulky and will fit in your pocket. It slides to reveal a QWERTY keyboard, although there’s no virtual touch-keyboard which would apparently come in handy at times.

It comes with a 3.2-inch display with 320x480 resolution, but it doesn’t feature a 3.5mm audio jack, but rather a ExtUSB jack that accepts microUSB. The device ships with 1GB microSD card, but these guys tested it with a 16GB microSDHC card and it ran just fine.

For a device that's supposed to function as a phone, the fact that it encounters occasional reception drops and frequent 3G drops. This could still be attributed to T-Mobile’s actual network, but we’re not sure whether this is the case. GPS straight up blows, as finding satellites is a tedious task and even when you do expect lost data, GPS or both.

The battery-life resulted in 11 hours and 21 minutes running the media player while the device was connected to a 3G network with WiFi off. This is not a very good result, as it’s a bit more than a third of iPhone 3G’s battery life.

As far as platform functionality goes, the phone is not perfect – but not too lacking, either. Bear in mind that Android is still nowhere as polished as its competition, but it packs some serious potential. There are still some minor glitches to be polished and occasional customer feedback will definitely do the trick, but it will take time.

You can read the full review here.

Last modified on Friday, 17 October 2008 04:56
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