Featured Articles

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel has released a 3G cellular modem with an integrated power amplifier that fits into a 300 mm2 footprint, claiming it…

More...
Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

It's not all rosy in the house of Intel. It seems that upcoming Atom out-of-order cores might be giving this semiconductor…

More...
TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC will start producing 16nm wafers in the first quarter of 2015. Sometime in the second quarter production should ramp up…

More...
Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S is the ‘tock’ of the Haswell architecture and despite being delayed from the original plan, this desktop part is scheduled…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 16 November 2007 12:11

Comcast to face class action lawsuit

Written by David Stellmack

Image

Caught with its hand in the cookie jar


Well, it seems now that all of the rumors and talk about Comcast engaging in bandwidth throttling and traffic shaping will play itself out in court. Jon Hart has filed a class action law suit against Comcast. The class action lawsuit includes all Comcast users in California who purchased Comcast broadband Internet services.

The lawsuit steams from what is being called the deliberate sabotaging of P2P traffic by Comcast, using bandwidth limiting techniques and traffic shaping technology. The lawsuit also claims that Comcast is or was transmitting hidden messages to the computers of users that are or were using P2P applications.

It will be interesting to see how this unfolds in court, as some people are suggesting that the freedom of the Internet is at stake, as well as what ISPs who provide service are or are not allowed to do to restrict access to certain services on the Internet. Some view the lawsuit as nothing more than people trying to protect their transfer of copyrighted material over P2P networks. One thing is for sure:  this will not be the last lawsuit of this type and it will be one nasty case to watch as it airs its dirty laundry in the media.

Last modified on Friday, 16 November 2007 12:24

David Stellmack

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments