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Wednesday, 10 June 2009 12:44

Nvidia mobile GPU failures didn't hurt demand

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Sales unscratched, unlike Nvidia's reputation


According to
Nvidia's VP of marketing Ujesh Desai, the company has not seen a drop in demand for its mobile GPUs following a number of issues reported by several vendors last year.

Although the issue might have dented Nvidia's reputation, notebook makers are still sticking with Nvidia GPUs, and apparently increasing their orders this year.

"None of the OEMs held that against us or anything," claims Desai. He believes Nvidia handled the issue well and that its swift reaction helped keep consumer confidence in check.

The failures, caused by poor materials, affected 8400M and 8600M chips used by various vendors in numerous notebook designs. Nvidia is using new materials in its subsequent mobile GPU series, and the issue should now be history. In spite of that, the cock up ended up costing Nvidia $196 million.

More here.
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