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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 26 September 2007 15:25

Cooler Master Hyper 212

Written by Fudzilla staff
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Review: 120mm fan and quad heatpipes

 

Heatpipe coolers have become pretty common place by now and just about every cooler manufacturer has a selection of coolers with heatpipes these days. Cooler Master has just launched its latest model, the Hyper 212 and we’ve taken one out for a spin to see if it’s any good.

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First and foremost, this is a gigantic cooler, it measures 122 x 92 x 160 mm (WxDxH) which might even make it unsuitable for some smaller cases. It’s also quite heavy at 710g, so make sure you don’t throw your case around too much after you’ve fitted it. The Hyper 212 comes fitted with a single 25mm deep 120mm fan, but brackets are supplied for an optional second fan. The pre-fitted fan is black but features blue LED lights. The only downside here is that the fan uses a 3-pin rather than a 4-pin fan connector, as it means it can’t be controlled as well as some other fans.
 
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It utilizes four heatpipes and has a copper base plate. The fins on the cooler are made from aluminum and are divided up into two separate sections. This should allow for improved airflow and circumvents most of the “dead zone” that you get from the center of the fan with traditional heatsinks.

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Last modified on Friday, 28 September 2007 12:48
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