Featured Articles

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel has released a 3G cellular modem with an integrated power amplifier that fits into a 300 mm2 footprint, claiming it…

More...
Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

It's not all rosy in the house of Intel. It seems that upcoming Atom out-of-order cores might be giving this semiconductor…

More...
TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC will start producing 16nm wafers in the first quarter of 2015. Sometime in the second quarter production should ramp up…

More...
Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S is the ‘tock’ of the Haswell architecture and despite being delayed from the original plan, this desktop part is scheduled…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 17 June 2010 13:22

AT&T starts to threaten over net neutrality

Written by Nick Farell
Image

Abandon the idea or a kitten dies

AT&T has told the US Federal Communications Commission that if the watchdog enacts new net neutrality rules it will switch off its s U-verse IPTV/broadband service.

AT&T Chief Executive Randall Stephenson told the Wall Street Journal that he will reconsider expanding the U-verse if the FCC brings in neutrality rules. U-verse has offered IP video and Internet since June 2006. Last year AT&T proudly announced U-verse's two millionth TV customer across a service area of 22 states.

However AT&T has constantly rolled back forecast of the number of homes it would serve. It has also tried telling U-verse broadband subscribers that AT&T reserved the right to temporarily reduce throughput speeds when "a customer is using other U-verse services in a manner that requires high bandwidth." In otherwords while you are watching HD telly, your Internet will go down. So, it is not surprising that that AT&T wants to avoid net neutrality laws.

However there are indications that AT&T has already slowed down U-verse deployment under the current rules. Looking through the annual reports, it seems that AT&T has been a bit reluctant to invest in U-verse and now it has a handy scapegoat.

The advantage of blaming the FCC is that it sends a message to the Senate “don't give these guys more power”.

Last modified on Sunday, 20 June 2010 16:54
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments