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Friday, 25 June 2010 09:39

SanDisk develops drive for 2110

Written by Nick Farell


If you plan to be around then
Hard drive maker SanDisk has lifted the kimono on a Secure Digital card that can store data for 100 years.

While the downside is that the card can only be written to once, SanDisk thinks that even the sands of time will not crack it. The WORM (write once, read many) card is "tamper proof" and data cannot be altered or deleted, SanDisk said in a statement.

The card is designed for long-time preservation of crucial data like legal documents, medical files and forensic evidence. The other downside is that the media can only store a 1GB. Quite how SanDisk can be sure that your porn stash will still be available to your great grandchildren is anyone's guess. They only say that the 100-year data-retention lifespan based on internal tests conducted at normal room temperatures.

The card looks like a DVD-write only media, but much smaller and with a much longer life span. The WORM works like conventional SD media, but only with compatible devices. Apparently it has found a customer in the Japanese police force which wants to archive images as an alternative to film. The company is working with a number of consumer electronics companies including camera vendors to support the media.

No word on price yet.
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