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Wednesday, 30 June 2010 10:09

Dell in deep do do

Written by Nick Farell
dell

Flogged dodgy machines to a university
Dell is looking jolly bad after after the math department at the University of Texas noticed some of its Dell computers failing.

According to the New York Times Dell told the University that it was making its computers work too hard by giving them difficult calculations. In fact according to the New York Times internal documents show Dell shipped at least 11.8 million computers from May 2003 to July 2005 that could fail.

The computers sent the university, in Austin, desktop PCs riddled with faulty electrical components that were leaking chemicals and causing the malfunctions. Everyone one of them went wrong, but Dell did not carry out a recall. The University sued three years ago and now documents recently unsealed in the case have been made public.

The paper's show that Dell was aware that the computers were likely to break. Still, the employees tried to play down the problem to customers and allowed customers to rely on trouble-prone machines.

Ironically the law firm defending Dell was affected when the tinman refused to fixing 1,000 of the dodgy computers.

Nick Farell

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