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Thursday, 08 July 2010 09:50

Microsoft makes a bomb from Xbox Live

Written by Nick Farell


$1.2 Billion and rising
Microsoft's Xbox Live service racked in $1.2 billion revenue for the fiscal 2009 year. According to figures found by Bloomberg, 12.5 million Xbox Live users paid an annual fee to play games online which amounted to $600 million in revenue.

Xbox Live COO Dennis Durkin told the financial magazine that on top of that, sales of DLC, movies and TV topped subscription revenue for the first time ever, and by a significant margin, leading us to the final $1.2 billion figure.

While the Xbox360 is only just profitable, the success with Xbox Live is key to Microsoft's Entertainment division. While the world+dog bangs on about Microsoft's inability to come up with new ideas it seems to have worked quite well on this idea. If the figures are right then it means that Redmond's revenue has jumped from $800 million in just a few years.

Nick Farell

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