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Friday, 30 July 2010 14:22

Big Blue buys Storwize

Written by Nick Farell


All your data compression are belong to us
IBM has written a cheque to buy the data compression technology company Storwize.

It is not clear how many zero's will be on the cheque but IBM said the deal will close in the third quarter of this year. Storwize provides technology that compresses files and other types of data in real-time in multiple computing environments.
The good thing about Storwize's data compression technology is that it does not degrade system or application performance, and creates space to store more data in IT environments.

Big Blue said that the technology will scan more historical data for analysis without the need for extra storage. One of the biggest problems for IBM is making sense of massive amounts of data in order to provide new services. Storwize's Random Access Compression Engine is based on an industry-standard compression algorithm. IBM offers database software including DB2 and analytics software to uncover and analyze information from multiple sources.

Nick Farell

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