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Friday, 06 August 2010 10:39

Google's ageist claim has to be heard

Written by Nick Farell


Supreme Court rules
Search outfit Google will have to defend itself from claims that it was ageist and fired a bloke for being too old.

Google thought it could avoid the case when a trial court judge chucked the case out. Then an Appeal court re-instated it. Google appealed against the Appeal to the California Supreme Court. However now the Supremes have agreed with the Appeal court and the case is back on the books. The case was bought against Google by Brian Reid, who was hired in 2002 as a director of operations and engineering, and fired less than two years later at age 54 after being told he was not a good "cultural fit".

The Supreme court said that the trial court should have considered "stray remarks" from Reid's colleagues, including that he was an "old man" and "old fuddy-duddy", that might be seen as evidence of bias. Google insists that it had legitimate, non-discriminatory reasons for firing Reid. Reid is a former associate professor of electrical engineering at Stanford University who had helped develop the AltaVista search engine. He claims that he was subjected to put-downs by a 38-year-old vice president who told him his ideas were "obsolete" and "too old to matter", and that he was "slow", "fuzzy", "sluggish" and "lethargic".

The plaintiff also said other colleagues made fun of his age, including a joke that a CD jewel case used as his office placard should instead be an "LP".

Nick Farell

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Comments  

 
-8 #1 thematrix606 2010-08-06 15:19
I registered to this site to post this comment:

Damn old people always complaining about something.
 
 
-3 #2 gangsta072 2010-08-07 08:44
Don't underestimate , old folks with experience and knowledge ; althought he might have not been fresh enough for the new web2.0 mini application...
 
 
-2 #3 thematrix606 2010-08-07 12:29
I must say I work in a medical company and we make software for radiotherapy planning... it's not a easy task, and our company is filled with old people 40-50+.
I'm the youngest there, along with a few other new developers, and I must say the old people do not have any idea of the new technologies out there and will/are not able to catch up.
They think in older, slower ways which are not efficient and do not provide quality to the user.
The biggest problem with old people is their egos and their arrogance of not continuously learning, because without this in the computer world, you are doomed to failure.

And you can vote me down all you want, we know who you are. Don't be scared of change, embrace it! But you can't, so keep on being grumpy.
 
 
-2 #4 Skywalker 2010-08-07 20:17
Quoting thematrix606:
I registered to this site to post this comment:

Damn old people always complaining about something.


I registered for this site to post this comment.

Damn morons are always complaining about something.
 
 
+4 #5 Skywalker 2010-08-07 20:20
Quoting thematrix606:
I must say I work in a medical company and we make software for radiotherapy planning... it's not a easy task, and our company is filled with old people 40-50+.
I
The biggest problem with old people is their egos and their arrogance of not continuously learning, because without this in the computer world, you are doomed to failure.

And you can vote me down all you want, we know who you are. Don't be scared of change, embrace it! But you can't, so keep on being grumpy.


I voted you down because you are an idiot. 40 is old? If you're lucky you'll live long enough to realize how stupid and immature you were at this point in your punk kid life.
 
 
-6 #6 thematrix606 2010-08-07 23:42
Quoting Skywalker:
I voted you down because you are an idiot. 40 is old? If you're lucky you'll live long enough to realize how stupid and immature you were at this point in your punk kid life.


Thank you for proving my point.

Btw, peak is 33, therefor above 33 is old, below it is young. It's not so hard to count. I am saddened that you are unable to deal with your age denials in a better way.

And you seem to miss my comment entirely.
 
 
+4 #7 OnePostWonder 2010-08-08 12:49
@thematrix606

You really are a moron.

People like you make me so sad. That evolution hasn't worked out a way of removing you from the gene pool is a tragedy.

I'm a 29 year old software team lead, and I know you're wrong. There are plenty of old people that are significantly smarter than you are.

There are even more young idiots out there, like yourself, with egos so large they aren't willing to learn from these amazing older people.

As for your theory about old people not learning; Einstein, Hawking, Newton, da Vinci... all did great things as "old" people, and shaped the modern world.

Some advice, listen more... talk less.
 
 
-2 #8 thematrix606 2010-08-08 21:22
Ok, stop the flamewar & personal name calling and be as one would say "intelligent".

Take on my comment line for line and answer each argument rather than naming some famous people (out of billions) who are discoverers/scientists/philosophers. I don't know what this has to do with old people learning? Please explain.

I will tell you why you are 29 years old and are wrong.

Basic truth: technology expands exponentially. Agree?

Tell me how the mind slows down after the first few years of college/uni/school. What about after you reach your peak?

Tell me how many companies have/will allow you to have the budget for constant training.

See where I am going with this?
 
 
+2 #9 Skywalker 2010-08-09 16:45
Quoting thematrix606:
Quoting Skywalker:
I voted you down because you are an idiot. 40 is old? If you're lucky you'll live long enough to realize how stupid and immature you were at this point in your punk kid life.


Thank you for proving my point.

Btw, peak is 33, therefor above 33 is old, below it is young. It's not so hard to count. I am saddened that you are unable to deal with your age denials in a better way.

And you seem to miss my comment entirely.

over 33 is old? Well, hopefully on you're 34th birthday you'll do the world a favor and kill yourself to make way for all the brilliant young people.
 

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