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Thursday, 12 August 2010 13:36

Vodafone backs down in row with Android customers

Written by Nick Farell


Peasants are revolting
Blighty phone outfit Vodafone has backed down in a row with punters over software updates for its Android phones.

Customers who own HTC Desire smartphones were ordered to download a software update which they believed was a much awaited upgrade to Android. However it downloaded irremovable Vodafone-branded apps and bookmarks, including links to dating sites. After shedloads of complaints Vodafone has decided to offer an update without the applications and finally upgrade users to the latest version of Android version 2.2. Vodafone said Version 2.2 will be ready in the next seven to 10 days while the junk applications will be offered as an optional download.

The only things that will be different on the Vodafone version of Android will be some tweaks to the network settings to optimise them for our network. However the incident has miffed customers who were getting together the torches and battering rams to have a full scale peasant's revolt. As one user told us, while it knew users wanted Froyo, Vodafone was unable to get anything out of the door other than branding and unwanted Vodafone software.

Vodafone said that the customised phone software "optimise customers' experience".  However customers thought that the person who thought about that needed their head optimising.
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