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Thursday, 16 September 2010 09:30

AMD talks about Bulldozer's new memory controller

Written by Nick Farell
amd

Details
AMD is starting to provide small amounts of details about its  Bulldozer micro-architecture. According to Xbit Labs, AMD wants to redesign the memory controller of its new central processing units (CPUs) in order to speed up memory access.

John Fruehe, the director of product marketing for server/workstation products at AMD said that although he could not talk about some of the enhancements to memory controllers, apparently the outfit has worked out a way to  reduce the time to access memory, both locally and remotely.

It looks like AMD's next-gen processors will not only improve memory accesses to remote memory banks, but also to local memory. With advances in memory controllers AMD can further improve performance of its chips and avoid memory-related bottlenecks.

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