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Thursday, 30 September 2010 16:21

Car crashes rise in the wake of texting bans

Written by Nedim Hadzic
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Drivers just find other distractions
Once upon the time, logic seemed to have suggested that banning text messaging while driving will decrease the number of car crashes, but this has since turned out to be quite the opposite. A study by US Highway Loss Data Institute says that the number has risen in some states, but thankfully the increased amount is said to be only “slight”.

HLDI’s study says that this move is “associated with a slight increase in the frequency of insurance claims filed under collision coverage for damage to vehicles in crashes." While some states where these laws were implemented showed no change at all, states like California, Louisiana and Minnesota are said to have had 7.6%, 6.7% and 8.9% respective increases in collision claims.

The study ultimately concludes that drivers who tend to get distracted will get distracted regardless of whether there’s a cell phone around or not. In fact, the study says that “anecdotal evidence from insurance claims” showed that distractions are far more than just phones; it lists messing with the radio, eating, drinking, swatting bees, applying make-up as well as shaving.

More here.

Nedim Hadzic

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