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Wednesday, 06 October 2010 10:12

Teen jailed for failing to surrender password

Written by Nick Farell

y_handcuffs


Not helping the police with their inquiries
In a landmark UK case, a teenager has been jailed for 16 weeks after he refused to give coppers the password to his computer. Oliver Drage, 19, of Liverpool, was arrested in May 2009 after coppers wanted to know about  a sexual exploitation ring they were investigating.

But coppers were baffled by a 50-character encryption password Drage had on his PC. He was formally asked to disclose his password but failed to do so, which is an offence under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000. Coppers are still  trying to crack the code on the computer to examine its contents and if there is anything nasty on his PC he will get another day in court.

Det Sgt Neil Fowler pointed out that Drage was previously of good character so the immediate custodial sentence handed down by the judge in this case shows just how seriously the courts take this kind of offence.

Nick Farell

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Comments  

 
+17 #1 thematrix606 2010-10-06 10:53
Yes, I bet that law was passed by the same idiots who pass all the other laws: people who don't know anything about anything!

Idiots.
 
 
+6 #2 semitope 2010-10-06 14:19
Quoting thematrix606:
Yes, I bet that law was passed by the same idiots who pass all the other laws: people who don't know anything about anything!

Idiots.


lol. Its true though. THe guys making these laws operate off what they are told by who exactly? They themselves can't be knowledgeable in every field they decide laws on

Anyway, good going with that password. Mine would probably be cracked in a sec by them. Makes me want to change it
 
 
+7 #3 thomasg 2010-10-06 15:53
The cops arrested a guy that was staying with me, and seized his computer. I'm glad they didn't throw me in jail! They asked me for his password, and I didn't tell them, and honestly I don't know it, though I might be able to figure it out if I tried hard enough.
 
 
+7 #4 bh192012 2010-10-06 18:06
16 weeks, and he hasn't been convicted of an actual crime yet, nice. Hell even if I wanted to give them a 50 character password, I'd probably forget part of it honestly.

10
The cool thing is, they can just ask him again. If he doens't give them the password, they can just throw him back in for 16 more weeks.
Goto 10
 
 
+2 #5 boobster 2010-10-06 18:35
Quoting bh192012:
16 weeks, and he hasn't been convicted of an actual crime yet, nice.



I'm not familiar with British law but did you read this part:

"He was formally asked to disclose his password but failed to do so, which is an offence under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000."



Quoting bh192012:
The cool thing is, they can just ask him again. If he doens't give them the password, they can just throw him back in for 16 more weeks.



Really? Is that how it works?
 
 
-10 #6 Xenon_aniki 2010-10-07 01:58
why dont they put the hard drive to another PC? i think that can work
 
 
+2 #7 Kakkoii 2010-10-07 06:22
Quoting Xenon_aniki:
why dont they put the hard drive to another PC? i think that can work


You must not know very much at all about computers it seems.

Windows, the thing you log into, is on the same drive. So putting it into another computer won't matter. You still have to log into the version of Windows that is installed on that hard drive, to access any private files.

It's up to you if you want to have Windows encrypt your files. When you click yes to make your profile private, this is what Windows does.

(Obviously you can have extra hard drives with files on them too, but this is someone who most likely kept the files on all drives encrypted, thus the need for a password from him.)
 
 
+2 #8 hoohoo 2010-10-07 06:31
@Kakkoii

Nor you my friend. You can put the disk into another PC as a non-boot drive. Then it will show up in Explorer as just another disk/

Of course if it encrypted you still have a problem.
 
 
+1 #9 deadspeedv 2010-10-07 09:24
Good old Windows Bitlocker. He either must of known they were on to him and he encrypted his computer with this 50 character password, or he has had it all along for his porn collection. If that is the case I willing the bet that he has a USB stick with a startup key hidden somewhere. Who the hell could remember 50 characters? You have to rely on a USB stick. CHECK UNDER HIS BED lol
 
 
0 #10 Nerdmaster 2010-10-07 15:41
I think the password has characters like *&^#{";|>?~`,?\+_=@!$%(])-45632}

They should use a cluster of 128 pcs each one having 4 5970 total 1024 5870 (3000 tera-flops). Then they may find it after trying for a year.
 

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