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Friday, 15 October 2010 09:25

Wireless networks can be hacked in five seconds

Written by Nick Farell
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Study claims
Wireless internet networks in millions of homes can be hacked in less than five seconds, a study claims. According to new research, a quarter of British private wireless networks do not have a password.

An ‘ethical hacking’ experiment in six cities, using freely available software, found almost 40,000 home wi-fi networks at high risk. Separately, there are concerns about the security of those who use free wi-fi networks offered by coffee shops and other businesses.

The study, commissioned by card protection and insurance firm CPP, highlights a ‘cavalier’ attitude to keeping data safe. According to the findings, nearly a quarter of private wireless networks has no password attached, making them immediately accessible to criminals. To make matters worse 82 per cent of Britons think their network is secure.

The report also found that hackers were able to ‘harvest’ usernames and passwords from unsuspecting people at a rate of more than 350 an hour, sitting in coffee shops and restaurants. Nearly a fifth of wireless users say they regularly use public networks.

CPP fraud expert Michael Lynch, said: ‘We urge all wi-fi users to remember that any information they volunteer through public networks can easily be visible to hackers.

Nick Farell

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Comments  

 
+17 #1 Jaberwocky 2010-10-15 10:06
I don't want to be seen as overly critical(Oh go on,yes i do :lol: ) but I thought the term hacking was when you were trying to crack a password.I would hardly call it hacking when you are going after WIFI with no passwords.More like piggybacking the WIFI.
 
 
+4 #2 deadspeedv 2010-10-15 12:14
I was just about to comment on that but sore you beat me to it. I wouldn't really call it "hacking" when there is no password or security involved. Simple WEP1 can be cracked in about 10-15min by a linux computer and a packet spoofing program, however more advanced variable key security (e.g. WPA2) plus disabling broadcast SSID normally works fine. I dont have to worry to much about wireless hackers where I live because most people around here are so tech illiterate they dont know if they have a wireless router or not.

However if you live in an apartment block you need security incase people start downloading kiddy porn off your net (happened to a friend of mine)
 
 
+5 #3 thetruth 2010-10-15 12:56
Wireless networks without passwords can be 'hacked'? Who'd've thunk it?

Just replace 'hacked' with 'accessed'.
 
 
+1 #4 yasin 2010-10-15 13:15
the more worrying issue is they're not protected.if wpa2 can be hacked in a few seconds, then i would also be worried =S
 
 
+1 #5 AndromedaB 2010-10-15 15:51
and yet they still believe an ip can directly link to the person behind it...
 
 
0 #6 Fud_u 2010-10-16 07:32
A link to download that software is highly appreciated :lol:
 
 
-1 #7 Wolfdale 2010-10-17 13:59
Quoting Jaberwocky:
I don't want to be seen as overly critical(Oh go on,yes i do :lol: ) but I thought the term hacking was when you were trying to crack a password.I would hardly call it hacking when you are going after WIFI with no passwords.More like piggybacking the WIFI.


doesnt change the point of this story really, but indeed the definition of "hacking" is not related to this story
 

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