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Monday, 18 October 2010 09:17

Aussie criminals make a fortune out of facebook

Written by Nick Farell
facebook

Give him a poke cobber
Aussie crims are making a killing by stealing Australians' identities from Facebook and and using the data to commit fraud. The chief executive of the Crime Commission, John Lawler, said that kiddies were building online profiles that include such things as interests, pets, relationships, travel plans and life stories.

According to AP, this helps Aussie organised crims get dodgy credit cards. Speaking to a conference international organised crime conference in Melbourne Lawler said that the problems caused by the failure to require companies that run online sites to report criminal activity to police.

Coppers are fuming that a lot of online information is still not reaching them. He said that victims of online fraud typically don't report it to authorities, rather to whichever organisation is the face of the transaction for them, such as eBay.

Lawler moaned that there was no process or requirement in place for organisations to on-report cyber fraud to authorities.

Nick Farell

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