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Friday, 22 October 2010 10:42

Redfaced Apple shows off security flaw

Written by Nick Farell


Oops
The fruity peddler of broken iPhones said has been showing off a beta version of its FaceTime video chat service to the Mac which has a fairly nasty security hole on it.

The beta was part of the Wednesday press conference where Steve Jobs showed it off and received a standing ovation from his tame press lackeys. A post on Macworld Germany claims that if you log-in to your account via FaceTime for Mac, the password can be changed without supplying the existing password.

So if you leave your computer someone could sit down at your Mac computer and change the password. Since this often applies across all Apple products, including iTunes you could be giving control of your entire Apple walled garden of delights to the hacker. Soon after the information was leaked, Apple Insider reported that clicking "View Account", where the password data was housed, didn’t work. It seems that Jobs Mob has frozen the problem until it can think of a better fix.

Apple fanboys insist that there is no problem as the chance of someone leaving their FaceTime-enabled Mac unattended in a public space long enough for someone to change a password seems unlikely. However it is hardly the point.

Nick Farell

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