Featured Articles

Nvidia Shield 2 shows up in AnTuTu

Nvidia Shield 2 shows up in AnTuTu

Nvidia’s original Shield console launched last summer to mixed reviews. It went on sale in the US and so far Nvidia…

More...
AMD CSO John Byrne talks ARM

AMD CSO John Byrne talks ARM

We had a chance to talk about AMD’s upcoming products with John Byrne, Chief Sales Officer, AMD. We covered a number…

More...
AMD Chief Sales Officer thinks GPU leadership is critical

AMD Chief Sales Officer thinks GPU leadership is critical

We had a chance to talk to John Byrne who spent the last two years as Senior Vice President and Chief…

More...
OpenPlus One $299 5.5-inch Full HD phone

OpenPlus One $299 5.5-inch Full HD phone

OnePlus is one of the few small companies that might disrupt the Android phone market, dominated by giant outfits like Samsung.…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 25 October 2010 09:12

Unlocking of iPhone sets stage for malware

Written by Nick Farell
apple

Rootkits on their way
The recent success of a group of hackers in compromising the security of Apple's iPhone may have opened the way for malware and root kits. At the ToorCon Hacking Conference Eric Monti, a Senior Researcher at Trustwave's Spider Labs demonstrated how the same kind of vulnerabilities and exploits that allowed a team of hackers to "jailbreak" iPhones and iPads from Apple's content restrictions could be used to push rootkit-style malware onto those devices.

This can be used to intercept credit card data from an iPhone-based transaction. Monti created a proof of concept iPhone rootkit, dubbed "Fat" by modifying the original jailbreakme code to create a stripped down remote monitoring application.

In an interview with Threatpost he said that he removed system prompts created by the jailbreakme app and added a rootkit feature to remotely control such key iPhone features as the microphone, camera and geolocation services, as well as SMS.

While the program is harmless and the vulnerabilities in question were patched by Apple in early August, Monti thinks that the iPhone is a soft target. "There are lots of different applications for causing mayhem," Monti said. "We talking about some pretty sensitive apps: banking, credit card processing, point of sale, SCADA," he said.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Comments  

 
0 #1 yourma2000 2010-10-25 13:37
It will get to the point when even phones will start needing to use antiviruses and firewalls
 
 
+3 #2 yasin 2010-10-25 14:00
they do lol. symbian s60 had f-secure since 2007
 

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments