Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 28 October 2010 09:14

Boffins close to creating a brain search

Written by Nick Farell
y_exclamation

Just stick a wire in your head
Boffins are close to creating a system where you can search your brain in the same way you do Google.

According to Ars Technica a recent experiment involved researchers hooking up twelve people up to a game where they fought to display a particular image on a screen by firing the correct neurons in their brain. The device was only successful about two-thirds of the time, but it was faster than many other brain-machine interfaces.

Researchers wanted to see if people are able to exert control over specific neurons in real time. This level of control is vital to get a computer to accomplish a task.

The 12 already have intracranial electrodes installed in their brains to help prevent epileptic episodes. They were presented with two pictures—one of Josh Brolin, the other of Marilyn Monroe and recorded which sets of neurons in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) fired as the subjects viewed each picture.

The wired people were were then shown the two images superimposed on each other, and had to "will" the superposition to fade into a distinct Josh Brolin or Marilyn Monroe. They were given between three and five seconds to complete the task.

It is starting to look like Googling with your brain rather than your keyboard may be the method of the future, along with jetpacks and taking a helicopter to work.

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments