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Wednesday, 16 January 2008 07:04

Infinity Ward shocked at PC COD 4 piracy rate

Written by David Stellmack

Image

…wonder why there are no PC titles



Robert Bowling, the Community Relations Manager at Infinity Ward, was commenting in his blog that Infinity Ward pulled some numbers over the past week and they were shocked at the number of PC Call Of Duty 4 players that were playing the multiplayer version of the game using stolen, cracked or pirated CD keys. While Bowling did not release the exact number, in order to get his attention the number had to be very significant.

And now it is time for our soap box stump speech. Once again, we cannot stress the importance of not engaging in this kind of behavior! It harms the gaming community as a whole and it really makes PC developers just want to give up on the development of software for the PC platform and stick with console development, where the piracy rate is lower. Over the last couple of years we have seen some of the best developers stop producing games for the PC platform, and some have opted to wade into the less pirate infested console waters.

The bottom line is that games cost a lot of money to produce these days; if developers cannot recoup their investment, they are going to stop producing games for the PC platform. If you want to try something before you buy it, use the demo…don’t pirate the game. Developers deserve to be paid for their work.  Think about that the next time you are considering using a hacked version of the game or a keygen to create a key to play the game, rather than buying it.

Read more on Bowling’s blog here.

Last modified on Wednesday, 16 January 2008 09:22

David Stellmack

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