Featured Articles

TSMC: Volume production of 16nm FinFET in 2H 2015

TSMC: Volume production of 16nm FinFET in 2H 2015

TSMC has announced that it will begin volume production of 16nm FinFET products in the second half of 2015, in late…

More...
AMD misses earnings targets, announces layoffs

AMD misses earnings targets, announces layoffs

AMD has missed earnings targets and is planning a substantial job cuts. The company reported quarterly earnings yesterday and the street is…

More...
Did Google botch the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9?

Did Google botch the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9?

As expected, Google has finally released the eagerly awaited Nexus 6 phablet and its first 64-bit device, the Nexus 9 tablet.

More...
Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 18 January 2008 07:24

Roadrunner to test usage-based billing

Written by David Stellmack

Image

Trying to weed out the hogs


In some rather depressing news, Time Warner Cable has announced that it will be piloting a trial for usage-based bandwidth billing. While we all know that bandwidth is not infinite, the RoadRunner folks are hoping to curb the excessive bandwidth use by hitting heavy users in their pocketbooks.

While bandwidth usage-based billing has been around for some time in the commercial and Web site realm, this is the first time that an ISP has attempted to move this billing model to the consumers’ arena. Of course, the pitch is that consumers that use less bandwidth will be charged less, but users that use the Internet for video streaming or Internet online game play (be it PC or console), could expect to pay much more under the proposed plan.

While the trial will only take place in Beaumont, Texas, our take is that depending on how it will be billed and at what rate, consumers could wind up paying much more for Internet access. The reality is that in a large household with kids and adults that are heavy Internet users, the cost could be considerably higher. Time Warner’s justification for the usage-based billing is that it will get some of the bandwidth hogs away from the Internet pipe, but the real truth is that it will save Warner money; with bandwidth usage down they will not have to add more bandwidth to service their customers. Time Warner claims that most customers will notice little or no change to their bill with this method.

Last modified on Friday, 18 January 2008 09:52

David Stellmack

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments