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Wednesday, 24 November 2010 11:25

Ivy Bridge 22nm may launch in early 2012

Written by Fuad Abazovic
intel_insidenew_logo

Q4 2011 production

 

There is an indication that Intel won't launch its Ivy Bridge 22nm series in Q4 2011 as some expected. This doesn’t mean that Intel’s CEO wasn’t telling the truth when he made the announcement at IDF, as Intel should most certainly ship the chips to partners in Q4 2011, and just not launch it.

This is what they did with Sandy Bridge 32nm monolithic core that is shipping as we speak but it will only get launch and available at CES after January 5th 2011.

Intel might change its mind closer to launch, but current roadmap and partner communication indicates that Ivy bridge 22nm should launch in first days of 2012, roughly a year after Sandy Bridge. CES 2012 maybe?

Intel knows that missing the holidays sales season is not particularly good idea, but also knows that not selling a huge stock of old chips is even worse. Intel wants to reinvent the market just like Apple did with the iPhone, and make people wait for January to buy new notebooks / desktops based on new chips.

iPhone 4 came in June 24th, the dullest possible summer day when just a few years ago no one would be thinking about buying a phone. This changed with Apple and Intel is hoping that it can do the same.

The trouble of other chip manufacturers, in particular AMD, is that Intel’s Ivy bridge is 22nm even if it ships in Q1 2012 is still comes a whole year before AMD’s 22nm products. This is a huge lead and AMD has yet to ship its Bulldozer in 32nm, promised for the first half of 2011.

Last modified on Wednesday, 24 November 2010 11:55
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Comments  

 
+10 #1 rundll 2010-11-24 13:27
"even if it ships in Q1 2012 is still comes a whole year before AMD’s 22nm products."

Is there actually any indicators that AMD has 22nm production in early 2013?
 
 
+5 #2 loadwick 2010-11-24 13:27
That's if there is a 2012!

Have we got confirmation what Sockets Ivy Bridge will be using? I'm not going to buy Sandy Bridge if i can't buy a new chip less than 12 months later!

I.V. was on track to be ready for middle of 2011 according to Intel so its a shame we have to wait for another 6 months because they dragged their feet so much on Sandy Bridge.

I wonder if Intel might pull a big suprise out and release a 22nm Extreme Edition pretty early on, like they did with the 6-core Nehalem, as the 32nm Sandy Bridge high-end will have only been out a few months when they release 22nm I.V.
 
 
+7 #3 loadwick 2010-11-24 13:45
Intel are going to run into real problems releasing low end first and then high end. If we look at the coming Sandy Bridge, if you buy the £200 cpu in the 'k' series then it reportily overclocks to 5GHz pretty easily on air. This will beat almost every single high-end Nehalem Intel has and so should stop all sales of LGA-1366.

We have to wait another 9 months or so to get LGA-1366's replacement even though this socket has been the longest of all of them.

But the problems don't stop there. A few months after the launch of Sandy Bridge high-end, LGA-2011, we will have Ivy Bridge at 22nm which may overclock even better or bring other improvements. Point is, do you spend loads on high-end that is now dated tech or buy mid-range that is cutting edge?
 
 
+12 #4 loadwick 2010-11-24 13:49
Intel should never force it's customers to make that decision. High-End should ALWAYS be at the cutting edge of what the companies has to offer otherwise why pay the massive price premium?
 
 
+9 #5 Nonameman 2010-11-24 14:16
Quoting loadwick:
Intel should never force it's customers to make that decision. High-End should ALWAYS be at the cutting edge of what the companies has to offer otherwise why pay the massive price premium?


You pay massive premiums for the product because you are part of a very small percentage. By that most companies are not buying the high end chips. They expect that the 1-2% of fanboys out there will buy their overpriced new chip for marginal gains in performance on software that doesn't really utilize the power of the CPU properly.

In short save your money and wait.
 
 
+7 #6 loadwick 2010-11-24 14:49
@Nonameman

Yes you are right but at least before those few percent were happy to spend that amount because they had the very latest and greatest eg 6 cores when everything else was 4 core, 32nm when everything else was 45nm...

With Sandy Bridge they will be 9 months behind and will have to wait even longer for 22nm. I just think Intel are shooting themselves in the foot by holding back the high-end stuff for so long.
 
 
-3 #7 boobster 2010-11-24 20:55
Quoting loadwick:
Intel are going to run into real problems releasing low end first and then high end. If we look at the coming Sandy Bridge, if you buy the £200 cpu in the 'k' series then it reportily overclocks to 5GHz pretty easily on air. This will beat almost every single high-end Nehalem Intel has and so should stop all sales of LGA-1366.



Most of the people/businesses that buy LGA-1366 don't overclock so that means almost nothing to them...
 
 
0 #8 boobster 2010-11-24 20:58
Quoting loadwick:
I just think Intel are shooting themselves in the foot by holding back the high-end stuff for so long.



I think it is a good strategy. They are SO far ahead and dominant right now that they don't have to concentrate on increasing sales. Instead, they will concentrate on other aspects of their business like reducing costs. By delaying new products, they can use their expensive tools for longer getting a better ROI.
 

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