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Wednesday, 24 November 2010 12:36

Microsoft sticks nag on Windows Phone 7

Written by Nick Farell



Some outfits never learn

Despite the fact that its nagware versions of Windows cost Microsoft more customers than it saved cash, Redmond is bringing in similar software on its Windows Phone 7 OS.

Apparently Microsoft has implemented a Genuine Software checker into Windows Phone 7. It uses PVK, defined as private keys that connect the OS to the device hardware. The keys sit on the device motherboard, and are accessed and verified by Windows Phone 7. If the keys cannot be found, then the OS concludes that the motherboard needs to be replaced and shuts down key cloud-based elements like Xbox Live, Marketplace and Zune.

The feature has been verified by HTC so it is official. The question is why Microsoft bothered risking the bad publicity. As with Windows Genuine Advantage, it's only a matter of time before someone finds a way around it. It will only stop a small number of people who want customised Windows Phone 7 ROMs.

Last modified on Wednesday, 24 November 2010 12:49
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Comments  

 
-5 #1 Nonameman 2010-11-24 14:10
One word "FAIL"!!!

MS does it again, pushes out bloatware with crapware installed forcing the hand of people to find better products.

I mean common MS, people aren't going to pirate their phones and most people don't want WP7 they want their Faddish Iphones and Droids.
 
 
+3 #2 yasin 2010-11-24 15:37
Quoting Nonameman:
One word "FAIL"!!!

MS does it again, pushes out bloatware with crapware installed forcing the hand of people to find better products.

I mean common MS, people aren't going to pirate their phones and most people don't want WP7 they want their Faddish Iphones and Droids.

have you tried a wp7 phone yet at all?
 
 
+2 #3 gamoniac 2010-11-24 16:42
"Why Microsoft bothers risking the bad publicity"? -- Seriously, you mean among the hackers community? Are you not allowed to protect your IP? Or should Microsoft just leave it wide open and make Windows a freeware? Would that please you?
 
 
+4 #4 Nonameman 2010-11-24 17:42
Quoting yasin:
Quoting Nonameman:
One word "FAIL"!!!

MS does it again, pushes out bloatware with crapware installed forcing the hand of people to find better products.

I mean common MS, people aren't going to pirate their phones and most people don't want WP7 they want their Faddish Iphones and Droids.

have you tried a wp7 phone yet at all?


Sure have! It is by far their best phone OS, but too little too late. I think some of the features are great (tiles) but not enough wow factor to win over most ppl. And they are behind the game.
 
 
+3 #5 Nonameman 2010-11-24 17:45
Quoting gamoniac:
"Why Microsoft bothers risking the bad publicity"? -- Seriously, you mean among the hackers community? Are you not allowed to protect your IP? Or should Microsoft just leave it wide open and make Windows a freeware? Would that please you?


They are allowed to protect it but things like WGA hold a certain level of distaste in the mouth of a large user set. I think they should protect it but to what lengths and how invasive are key. WGA is annoying even to those who have legit copies.
 
 
+5 #6 Ferdinand 2010-11-24 17:46
Quoting gamoniac:
"Why Microsoft bothers risking the bad publicity"? -- Seriously, you mean among the hackers community? Are you not allowed to protect your IP? Or should Microsoft just leave it wide open and make Windows a freeware? Would that please you?

The evil people never see nagware. Only well meaning people that know barely enough how to install an OS and customers are bothered by nagware.
 

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