Featured Articles

Analyst reveals Apple Watch spec

Analyst reveals Apple Watch spec

An analyst has examined the Apple Watch supply chain in an effort to ascertain the exact spec of Cupertino’s new gadget…

More...
Nvidia's first 20nm product is a mobile SoC

Nvidia's first 20nm product is a mobile SoC

For much of the year we were under the impression that the second generation Maxwell will end up as a 20nm…

More...
Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia adjusts GTX 980 and GTX 970 pricing

Nvidia adjusts GTX 980 and GTX 970 pricing

It appears that Nvidia has been feeling the pulse of the market and took some note from comments regarding the original…

More...
PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

Today we will take a look at the PowerColor TurboDuo Radeon R9 285. The card is based on AMD’s new…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 25 November 2010 11:41

Freedom of twitter speech in question

Written by Nedim Hadzic

twitter_logo


Free to talk but you won’t necessarily walk
It seems that the longer we’re around, the more our freedoms shrink. As it stands today, the freedom to emit a single sentence to people willing to read it can get you in severe trouble as some unfortunate fellows found out.

One of those was joking around with his friends about blowing up an airport whereas the other was venting his frustration over a radio phone-in saying how the journalist should be stoned to death. Both of them are currently without jobs and in serious trouble.

In the “airport case” Judge Jacqueline Davis rejected Paul Chambers’ appeal because of “the context of times we live in”. The judge found that such a context made the message “obviously menacing”, although many twitter users strongly disagree.

All this brought about a heated debate about the limits of free speech on Web 2.0. While some argue that the cases are simple misunderstandings of concepts like sarcasm, others claim that the legal ramifications of such actions are many, regardless of whether it’s serious or not.

We must admit that it’s a bit scary where the “freedom of speech” is heading, as it’s increasingly more like a short rulebook of speech instead of an actual freedom.
Last modified on Thursday, 25 November 2010 11:47

Nedim Hadzic

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments