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Tuesday, 30 November 2010 10:26

Intel confirms accelerators in Sandy Bridge

Written by Nick Farell
intel_logo_new

Dedicated circuitry for media acceleration
Chipzilla has confirmed that its Sandy Bridge processor will pack media acceleration circuitry to speed up media. Intel had hinted at the concept earlier this month, but has now gone on record to confirm it. Sandy Bridge will support DirectX 10.1 and OpenCL 1.1.

According to Cnet, Stephen L. Smith, vice president and director of PC Client operations and enabling at Intel, confirmed that the Sandy Bridge processor--to be announced January 5--will pack media acceleration circuitry.

Smith said that Sandy Bridge will have cool dedicated circuitry for media acceleration. "All of us in our daily use, whether it's home videos or photos tend to pull things from the Internet, pull things from our own capture devices at home, bring them on to our PC, transform them into different formats...all of that will be dramatically faster if one utilizes this hardware acceleration, media acceleration that we have on Sandy Bridge," he said. He added that Sandy Bridge should enable slimmer designs that perform more like mainstream laptops.

Intel is on track to deliver the 22-nanometer Ivy Bridge, which will be Sandy Bridge's successor, by the end of 2011. Intel has invested eight billion dollars to equip up to four factories for 22-nanometer production.

It looks like Ivy Bridge will be a shrink of Sandy Bridge with some enhancements. He also claimed that Intel will be getting to 8 nanometer chips by 2017.

Last modified on Tuesday, 30 November 2010 10:56
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Comments  

 
+14 #1 Tr0y 2010-11-30 11:51
Can somebody definitely confirm that the GPU part of Sandy Bridge will support OpenCL 1.1 - and not only the CPU?
 
 
+5 #2 Bl0bb3r 2010-11-30 13:00
Quoting Tr0y:
Can somebody definitely confirm that the GPU part of Sandy Bridge will support OpenCL 1.1 - and not only the CPU?


Their GPU's aren't programmable... so the answer is no. Also DirectX 11 features DirectCompute. If they would have supported OpenCL on GPU then by any definition they would also support DC or at least the DC version that runs on DirectX 10, hinting at GPGPU or a dumbed down version of GPGPU for such a graphics chip.
 
 
0 #3 Tr0y 2010-11-30 13:23
Quoting Bl0bb3r:
Their GPU's aren't programmable...



Wrong. I just did some research.
Sandy Bridge uses Intel GMA HD Graphics 100 / HD Graphics 200 which has 6/12 pixel pipelines. And supports OpenCL 1.1

So the answer to my own question is: YES :)
 
 
+7 #4 DJDestiny 2010-11-30 14:42
Quoting Tr0y:
Intel GMA HD Graphics 100 / HD Graphics 200 which has 6/12 pixel pipelines. )

Those are execution units not pipelines .
 
 
+13 #5 dicobalt 2010-11-30 17:35
Media acceleration circuitry = shitty integrated graphics
 
 
+8 #6 yasin 2010-11-30 18:47
Quoting dicobalt:
Media acceleration circuitry = shitty integrated graphics

well it is intel after all.their gma chips hardly set the world alight.
 
 
+2 #7 Naterm 2010-11-30 19:42
Quoting dicobalt:
Media acceleration circuitry = shitty integrated graphics







Probably not. Anandtech's SNB coverage indicated that they'd have fixed function video encoding hardware onboard. In other words, it's probably not the GPU.

While intel's graphics do indeed suck, you have to look at the performance increase between generations. They may get somewhere in a few years. Intel could definitely build a powerful GPU, but I think trying with x86 was a bad idea. They try to shoehorn that ISA into places it's not fit to go.
 
 
+3 #8 Bl0bb3r 2010-11-30 19:56
Quoting Tr0y:
Wrong. I just did some research.



Did you now!... is that the recent troll-codex? I was usually expecting you to just start a wild rant-spree on how right you are without any shred of evidence!

Quoting Tr0y:
has 6/12 pixel pipelines.



That's not useful here.

Quoting Tr0y:
And supports OpenCL 1.1



Are you sure? From the way I see it AMD Sempron 3500+ has ZERO pixel-pipelines... supports OpenCL 1.1.

Yeah... that makes perfect sense.

Quoting Tr0y:
So the answer to my own question is: YES :)



YES, you troll too much.
 
 
0 #9 The_Countess 2010-11-30 21:28
Quoting Tr0y:
Can somebody definitely confirm that the GPU part of Sandy Bridge will support OpenCL 1.1 - and not only the CPU?


ALL gpu's that support dx9 and upwards CAN support openCL. its just a question of implementing drivers.
and no guaranties for the performance of course.
 
 
0 #10 DJDestiny 2010-12-01 15:54
And to add on , these "add-on" execution units are just like stream processors , but much much worser performance .
Their 12 Execution units aren't even comparable to 3 SP's ( By AMD )
 

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