Featured Articles

Intel takes credit for three-way 4K gaming

Intel takes credit for three-way 4K gaming

All of a sudden Intel is talking about desktop gaming like there is no tomorrow and it is pushing it. The…

More...
Nvidia Shield Tablet 32GB 4G LTE out for pre orders

Nvidia Shield Tablet 32GB 4G LTE out for pre orders

Nvidia has finally revealed the shipping date of its Shield Tablet 32GB in 4G LTE flavour and in case you pre-order…

More...
Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple has finally unveiled its eagerly awaited smartwatch and surprisingly it has dropped the "i" from the brand, calling it simply…

More...
Skylake 14nm announced

Skylake 14nm announced

Kirk B. Skaugen, Senior Vice President General Manager, PC Client Group has showcased Skylake, Intel’s second generation 14nm architecture.

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 01 December 2010 10:03

Free software archive attacked

Written by Nick Farell
hackers

Encrypted passwords nicked
The Savannah GNU free software archive has been attacked with encrypted passwords stolen that enabled the attackers to access restricted project material.

The hackers used a SQL injection attack against the savannah.gnu.org site which has bought the operation to its knees. The site is still offline and a notice says that the group has finished the process of restoring all of the data from a clean backup and bringing up access to some resources.

However it is still in the middle of adjusting its security settings to prevent further attacks. Some of the passwords were discovered by brute-force attack, leading in turn to project membership access, the site said. The site has been rolled back to November 23 when all was working.

“While effort was made in the past to fix injection vulnerabilities in the Savane2 legacy codebase, it appears this was not enough," the group said in its notice.

So far only one project appears to have been affected by the compromise.

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments