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Wednesday, 01 December 2010 10:22

Mozilla fumes at Google, Apple and Microsoft's illegal plug ins

Written by Nick Farell
firefox

Stop being evil guys
Open Saucer Asa Dotzler says he has had a gutsful of Apple, Microsoft and Google installing software plug-ins, without permission, into the Mozilla Foundations Firefox Web browser. Writing in the Foundation's bog, Dotzler, who is Mozilla's community coordinator told the outfits to "stop being evil."

Microsoft , Google, Apple, and others think that it is an OK practice to add plug-ins to Firefox.  When you install Apple's iTunes, Jobs' Mob thinks it is  OK to add the iTunes Application Detector plug-in to my Firefox web browser without asking, he moaned. Microsoft sneaked in its Windows Live Photo Gallery and Office Live plug-ins without his knowledge, he added. Then Google thought it was OK to slip a Google Update plug-in into Firefox Google Earth or Google Chrome is installed.

He complained that this is not OK behaviour. If a user installed a specific application from these vendors intending to have only that application installed, they should not have additional software foisted on them. Dotzler said that the big software companies were installing a trojan horse. While the additional pieces of software installed without  consent may not be malicious, the means by which they were installed was sneaky, underhanded, and wrong.

He called on the big software companies to stop this sort of action.  If they wanted to add software to a system they should ask the user. Dotzler admits that Firefox could do more to help users block out secret software plug-ins, but he argues that trustworthy actions from Apple, Microsoft and Google are needed.

Nick Farell

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+68 #1 Warhead 2010-12-01 10:44
Quote:
Jobs' Mob thinks it is OK to add the iTunes Application Detector plug-in to my Firefox web browser without asking


It's NOT ok...and I agree. That not only slows down Pc but you have no control over what information (from your hard drive) is going out to the companies.
 
 
+43 #2 function69 2010-12-01 11:13
The NEW axis of evil :lol:
 
 
+41 #3 Bl0bb3r 2010-12-01 11:33
Just a few days ago I wanted to try the new Acrobat Reader X... guess what, I have to install a download manager plugin to download it. WTF!?!?... like Firefox couldn't download it using HTTP alone.

Add to that list Nokia and Winamp as well.

Quoting function69:
The NEW axis of evil :lol:



That disable button is a pretty good axis killer. This way they can't reinstall it and I don't have to worry about them phoning home with my data.
 
 
-45 #4 PainPig 2010-12-01 12:19
Quote: "Dotzler admits that Firefox could do more to help users block out secret software plug-ins, but he argues that trustworthy actions from Apple, Microsoft and Google are needed."


Could you sound more naive, I mean really, asking those guys to be upfront and honest is just plain dumb. You have to do it yourself. Now that I know about those plug-ins, I am going to maybe find another Browser to use.
 
 
+36 #5 Wolfdale 2010-12-01 14:15
Quoting PainPig:
Could you sound more naive, I mean really, asking those guys to be upfront and honest is just plain dumb. You have to do it yourself. Now that I know about those plug-ins, I am going to maybe find another Browser to use.


so your saying its wrong that mozilla brings this under the attention of the world?
and even tough im pretty sure mozilla has its own ways of doing sort-like things
if i install winamp, i select to disable the winamp agent, and all the other crap that comes with it like those music stores, a winamp searchbar etc..

if however winamp would still install *anything* else but the winamp media player, yes i do mind that.. a lot
 
 
-3 #6 Dracusis 2010-12-01 17:39
If Windows had proper account profiles like Linux and OS-X wouldn't that prevent these companies from modifying other program files?

I always though one of the most stupid things windows did was make other applications vulnerable to each other all in the name of "active-x" crap where bits of one app can load into another - the root cause of almost all windows security flaws from memory or is my understanding of this all screwy and totally off?
 
 
+17 #7 redisnidma 2010-12-01 18:20
I keep my web browser toolbar-free from all that crap floating around. Say no to google toolbar, yahoo, msn Live and all that crapware from your browsers guys. What a difference it makes. ;-)
 
 
+13 #8 Wolfdale 2010-12-01 20:12
Quoting redisnidma:
I keep my web browser toolbar-free from all that crap floating around. Say no to google toolbar, yahoo, msn Live and all that crapware from your browsers guys. What a difference it makes. ;-)


the difference this newpost makes, is that even when you say no to all that crap,
some companies/applications STILL install a bunch of unasked/invisible plugins,

the way you talk is more like "what you dont see doesnt count"
 
 
-9 #9 redisnidma 2010-12-01 22:15
Quoting Wolfdale:
Quoting redisnidma:
I keep my web browser toolbar-free from all that crap floating around. Say no to google toolbar, yahoo, msn Live and all that crapware from your browsers guys. What a difference it makes. ;-)


the difference this newpost makes, is that even when you say no to all that crap,
some companies/applications STILL install a bunch of unasked/invisible plugins,

the way you talk is more like "what you dont see doesnt count"

SO what's stopping you from removing these so-called "invisible plugins" from your browser?
Or better still, what's stopping you from not downloading them at all?

Sounds to me like a poor excuse.
 
 
+8 #10 Bl0bb3r 2010-12-01 23:23
Quoting redisnidma:
Or better still, what's stopping you from not downloading them at all?

Sounds to me like a poor excuse.






Inexperience... from a different point of view.

Two weeks ago I installed a Win 7 for a kid... with Firefox, Office and an AV. A few days a go I found two toolbar-crapware installed on that computer and one of them was pushing Confiker out its ass and messing with jscript.dll making some apps partially non-working. It encrypted the worm somehow that it got past KAV, EAV, Norton and a bunch of other AVs that the kid tried and the alerts and cleaning were fired only when Confiker was executed. It's enough to say that the kid didn't knew that a toolbar/addon can do that.
 

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