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Wednesday, 01 December 2010 14:14

Wikileaks moves to Amazon cloud

Written by Nick Farell


Hiding in the mainstream
Whistleblowing site Wikileaks hopes to duck loads of denial of service attacks by hiding in Amazon's cloud.

Wikileaks has been hit by several distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. The site was temporarily shutdown by the onslaught, but is functioning again after migrating its services to Amazon's cloud.

Wikileaks recently published thousands of confidential diplomatic cables that were sent between the US State Department and embassies around the world. The leaked documents shed light on US intelligence gathering efforts and reveal sensitive information pertaining to US foreign relations. The disclosure of the cables has proved embarrassing for the US and a number of other governments.

Wikileaks has announced that the DDoS was pummeling its servers at a rate of 10 gigabits per second, forcing its Swedish hosting provider to discontinue operation of the site Amazon's cloud computing infrastructure can handle massive DDoS attacks.

Last modified on Wednesday, 01 December 2010 14:58

Nick Farell

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