Featured Articles

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

We wanted to learn a bit more about Qualcomm's plans for wearables and it turns out that the company believes its…

More...
Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

We had a chance to talk to Michelle Leyden-Li, Senior Director of Marketing, QCT at Qualcomm and get an update on…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

Today we will take a look at the PowerColor TurboDuo Radeon R9 285. The card is based on AMD’s new…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 10 December 2010 09:50

Copyright trolls demand Drudge Report domain

Written by Nick Farell
y_exclamation

Claimed that it used a picture without permission
Copyright troll Righthaven has demanded that the high-profile online magazine the Drudge Report hand over its domain name.

Righthaven is an outfit which acts as a legal enforcer for the various newspapers and magazines. It makes cash by sending out legal letters to bloggers who use its clients material without permission.

One of the demands it usually makes is for the blogger to lose their domain name. Only this time the outfit it is threatening is the Drudge Report, which is accused of carrying a Denver Post photo of a TSA agent searching an air traveller last month.

Righthaven has demanded a federal judge in each of its 180-plus cases to order its targets to hand over their domains. So far  70 of its cases have settled out of court, and their terms are confidential.

According to the Electronic Frontier Foundation Righthaven is using the threat as a method to coerce settlements from rank-and-file websites that cannot afford to defend themselves. According to Wired, in civil copyright litigation, there is no legal basis for such a demand, even if the website is breaching copyright law.

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments