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Wednesday, 15 December 2010 12:00

Gawker passwords revealed

Written by Nedim Hadzic
y_analyst

123456 and 12345678 hit top 10
The recent hacking of Gawker Media resulted in hackers publishing usernames and passwords. WSJ crunched some numbers and came up with an interesting analysis of most used passwords.

So, out of 188,279 stolen passwords, top ten used passwords were as follows:
  1. 123456
  2. password
  3. 12345678
  4. lifehack
  5. qwerty
  6. abc123
  7. 111111
  8. monkey
  9. consumer
  10. 12345

We’re really not very surprised at seeing “123456”, “12345678” and “qwerty” sitting in top spots, as most people tend to just be lazy when devising passwords. There’s also the risk of forgetting it so its’s best to use a simple one - we get that. What we really don’t get though is where does “monkey” fit in. (Damn, I've gotta change my password. sub.ed.)

WSJ’s analysis also shows that Gmail and Yahoo email users are more prone to using eight or more characters in their passwords than Microsoft users.

You can find the full analysis here.


Last modified on Wednesday, 15 December 2010 12:13

Nedim Hadzic

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