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Thursday, 13 January 2011 12:00

Parents using Facebook to terrorize teachers

Written by


Ironic cyber bullying twist
Teachers have had to put up with all sorts of mischief from kids since the dawn of time, but the advent of the internet and social networking has made their lives even worse. However, now that those teachers managed to come up with ways to fend off pesky kids, it seems that British parents are equally willing to make teachers’ lives miserable.

The NAHT school association claims it receives hundreds of calls from concerned teachers who are targeted by the parents of their students rather than the students themselves. The new trend has already prompted the NAHT to issue formal guidelines on cyber bullying perpetrated by parents.

NAHT General Secretary Russell Hobby noted that parents have a right to express their views and voice their concerns, but that they are often taking things too far.

“Too often, though, social networking sites are a medium for the unreasonable and the unprincipled and have a momentum out of all proportion to reality,” said Hobby. He noted that such complaints often turned into gossip, petitions, public campaigns and even libelous comments.

Clearly the apple does not fall far from the tree and most kids turn out messed up thanks to their parents rather than the internet, games, Judas Priest or Marylyn Manson, depending on one’s age.

More here.

 

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