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Tuesday, 25 January 2011 14:41

Firefox, Google Chrome adding 'Do Not Track' tools

Written by Nick Farell
firefox

No one wants to be less secure than Microsoft
Firefox and Chrome browsers are to get the same tools to block advertisers from collecting information on their habits as Internet Explorer users have.

Alex Fowler, a technology and privacy officer for Firefox maker Mozilla, says the "Do Not Track" tool which was seen in the latest beta of Internet Explorer will be the first in a series of steps designed to guard privacy. He doesn't say when Firefox will get the tool will be available.

Google Chrome users can now download a browser plug-in that blocks advertisers - but only from ad networks that already let people decline, or opt out of, personalised, targeted ads. Both versions appear to be better developed than the Internet Explorer equivalent which requires users to make up lists of the advertisers they want to leave them alone.

At the moment the browsers are much of a muchness with very little between them. It seems that one maker comes up with one idea, another follows. However it is starting to look as if there is a consensus that people do not want advertising cookies, particularly those which cannot be deleted.


Nick Farell

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