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Tuesday, 25 January 2011 15:07

16 graphics EUs in Ivy bridge

Written by Fuad Abazovic
intel_logo_new

Not 24 as hoped
Not only does Ivy Bridge pack graphics that can cope with DirectX 11 specification it also has more executing units or EUs. Nvidia calls them Shaders or graphics processors while Intel still prefers the acronym EU.

Back in October, our sources were convinced that Intel doubled the EU number from 12 to 24 but according to the latest communication between Intel and its partners the number sunk to 16.  This again means that Intel’s next generation 22nm CPU with graphics gets substantially faster as the clock can go further up and that just based on more EUs, you can expect at least 25 percent better scores compared to Sandy Bridge.

DirectX 11 support will definitely be a powerful marketing tool, but many know that gaming on Intel is not something that you can recommend to many. However it will let you play some basic games at acceptable eye candy rates. Intel claims it will be enough for mainstream gaming on a broad range of titles and native DirectX 11 support.

Intel plans further enhancements in multimedia parts of graphics in order to make decoding and encoding of DVD and Blu-ray content faster, as the company expects that many will want to burn or share this HD content.


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Comments  

 
+10 #1 Coliz91 2011-01-25 16:19
Well..that might be awesome enough to use for 1080p/i playback content,i suppose :-*
 
 
+20 #2 loadwick 2011-01-25 16:28
That is a real shame, given they are at 22nm now i thought they would be pushing on further not pulling back. Its not like the rules the integrated graphics world and can take their foot of the gas is it!

Quote:
you can expect at least 25 percent better scores



Problem is 7-8fps + 25% still equals unplayable! Intel need to be doubling, tripling the GPU speeds at ever refresh, 25% won't cut it.

Maybe the new deal with nVidia will bring better cores but we won't see that in Ivy Bridge.

I like the sound of QuickSync 2.0, i hope they improve the code-path so quality is improved as well as speed.
 
 
+8 #3 insight 2011-01-25 17:52
Don't take my comment bold, Fuad, but where did you get that from? Any evidence?

Because 16 EUs would be very bad news, indeed!
 
 
+11 #4 arclight 2011-01-25 20:54
Integrated GPUs will always dissapoint me, yeah i said it!
 
 
+2 #5 smartidiot89 2011-01-25 21:26
The IGP Intel has in Sandy-Bridge isn't THAT bad since the CPU is used alot to do some of the heavy lifting.

What Intel needs is better drivers but what is really lacking is having the GPU being programmable for GPGPU-tasks but hey it's Intel so I guess they will keep aiming for x86 and more CPU-cores instead :P
 
 
+10 #6 braindead 2011-01-25 21:30
"just based on more EUs, you can expect at least 25 percent better scores compared to Sandy Bridge"

Maybe Fuad should go back to school...
16/12 = 1.333333 => 33.3% better scores
it's not THAT hard...

of course, that's discounting clock changes and any efficiency changes that adding DX11 ability might cause.

PS: The 25% would be correct when reducing from 16 to 12 EUs ;)
math's crazy sometimes
 
 
+1 #7 dicobalt 2011-01-25 22:38
Why would you care if any integrated graphics does DX11? DX11 applications are exclusively high end and an integrated gpu could never perform in an acceptable way. Those transistors would have been put to better use increasing baseline performance in applications that will be used in real life. Or better yet reduce the total amount of transistors and save some power draw.
 
 
+7 #8 Harry Lloyd 2011-01-25 23:28
Quoting braindead:
"just based on more EUs, you can expect at least 25 percent better scores compared to Sandy Bridge"

Maybe Fuad should go back to school...
16/12 = 1.333333 => 33.3% better scores
it's not THAT hard...

of course, that's discounting clock changes and any efficiency changes that adding DX11 ability might cause.

PS: The 25% would be correct when reducing from 16 to 12 EUs ;)
math's crazy sometimes

What good are shaders when the amount of ROPs and TMUs will probably remain the same, plus shared RAM.

This is ridiculous. Fusion will blow that away, that's what an APU is supposed to look like.
 
 
+2 #9 loadwick 2011-01-25 23:33
Quoting braindead:
"just based on more EUs, you can expect at least 25 percent better scores compared to Sandy Bridge"

Maybe Fuad should go back to school...
16/12 = 1.333333 => 33.3% better scores
it's not THAT hard...

of course, that's discounting clock changes and any efficiency changes that adding DX11 ability might cause.

PS: The 25% would be correct when reducing from 16 to 12 EUs ;)
math's crazy sometimes



No idea why people are marking you down for pointing out this simple mistake.

I guess he might be saying that the performance is non-linearly to the number of EU. As he did mention the fact that the EUs will be clocked much faster too.
 
 
-3 #10 loadwick 2011-01-25 23:44
Quoting Harry Lloyd:
What good are shaders when the amount of ROPs and TMUs will probably remain the same, plus shared RAM.

This is ridiculous. Fusion will blow that away, that's what an APU is supposed to look like.



I thought i read that Ivy Bridge will have 1GB of dedicated RAM on-die.
 

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