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Thursday, 27 January 2011 11:13

ISPs rebel against new EU laws

Written by Nick Farell
eu

Data retention not us
It seems that ISP have had a gutsful of European politicians trying to turn them into secret police.

New EU Parliament laws are being drawn up to impose new requirements on telecommunications companies to store information about their customers, but there are telephone companies that have decided to oppose the law. However according to P3, Internet operator Bahnhof has said that it will go out of its way to make the law toothless.

Karlung who is company president said that the ISP will let its traffic to go through a VPN service so that his company has no clue what its customers do online, which they sent or are talking to. Any information that is stored will be tiny and irrelevant to the coppers. Several other telecom operators and ISPs are now trying to find technical solutions that  follows the law, but makes it toothless.

Justice Minister Beatrice Ask has admitted that there are loopholes in the government's proposed new law.


Nick Farell

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Comments  

 
-3 #1 East17 2011-01-27 12:20
And do the European population do about their own Parliament ? Do they understand that THEY pay these guys to be their Nazi Secret Police?
 
 
+17 #2 Exodite 2011-01-27 12:35
Quoting East17:
...

And this is differs from what part of the world exactly?

It's not like governments abusing their power is exclusive to European nations.

Heck, if I wanted to make a point out of it I'd question who's pulling the strings to make the European Parliament push this through in the first place.

Rest assured it's not the Parliament itself as they have nothing, directly, to gain from it.
 
 
+13 #3 Bl0bb3r 2011-01-27 18:14
US threatening to WTO-blacklist EU... again? /rhetoric

Anyway, the ISP's initiative is applaudable. What did the US ISP's do in the same instance? Sold out their customers!
 
 
-1 #4 JAB Creations 2011-01-27 20:13
Quoting East17:
Do they understand that THEY pay these guys to be their Nazi Secret Police?


Europeans including Germans aren't interested in enforcing this so what you meant to say was racist communist jewish police.
 

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