Featured Articles

Nvidia Shield 2 shows up in AnTuTu

Nvidia Shield 2 shows up in AnTuTu

Nvidia’s original Shield console launched last summer to mixed reviews. It went on sale in the US and so far Nvidia…

More...
AMD CSO John Byrne talks ARM

AMD CSO John Byrne talks ARM

We had a chance to talk about AMD’s upcoming products with John Byrne, Chief Sales Officer, AMD. We covered a number…

More...
AMD Chief Sales Officer thinks GPU leadership is critical

AMD Chief Sales Officer thinks GPU leadership is critical

We had a chance to talk to John Byrne who spent the last two years as Senior Vice President and Chief…

More...
OpenPlus One $299 5.5-inch Full HD phone

OpenPlus One $299 5.5-inch Full HD phone

OnePlus is one of the few small companies that might disrupt the Android phone market, dominated by giant outfits like Samsung.…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 03 February 2011 11:00

Zalman ZM-NC3000U notebook cooler tested - Testing

Written by Muamer Odobasic
Zalman_ZMThumb

Review: As cool as cucumber with a 220mm fan

 

ZM-NC3000U is aimed at laptops ranging from 9’’ to 17’’. This might prove to be quite popular with users, especially those with larger and hotter laptops. The implemented fan speed regulator will allow for manual regulation and finding that perfect balance between noise and cooling.

The fan is very quiet at minimum RPM, almost inaudible. That’s not to say that maximum RPM of 720 is loud, as we found it to be acceptable.

We used two laptops for our testing - a slightly older HP Pavilion DV9000 and the new Sony Vaio VPCEB1M1E. We stressed the laptops using Prime 95 and got the following results:

HP_Pavilion_Tabela

First test used the 17’’ HP Pavilion DV9000 with Mobile AMD Turion 64 X2 dual-core, notable for bad heatsink design and prone to overheating. As you can see, Zalman’s ZM-NC3000U took care of that in no time.

The second test used a few months old 15,5’’ Sony Vaio VPCEB1M1E running on Intel’s Core i7 330M CPU

.

Vaio_Tabela




(Page 4 of 5)
Last modified on Thursday, 03 February 2011 12:53
blog comments powered by Disqus

Comments  

 
0 #1 ghelyar 2011-02-03 14:14
1) These are nothing new. Someone didn't suddenly have a brainstorm and realise that there were more notebook users.

2) I actually see more and more desktop users now, realising that they always leave their laptops plugged in 24/7 anyway.

3) The numbers are pretty insignificant. I bought a $5 cooler from a manufacturer I had never heard of once and the numbers were better than that. It was significant enough to actually stop the notebook from overheating.
 
 
+1 #2 Bl0bb3r 2011-02-03 17:51
That's because notebooks have finally come down in price and gone up in performance just enough for the average faceboob &/ facebook user and offices.

However, the way they count the things probably offers irrelevant data, as 90% of the surveys only include US-based citizens, neglecting the billions in EMEA, Oceania, South America.
 
 
+1 #3 123s 2011-02-03 22:35
i woudlnt want a notebook that needs a extra cooler :S
 
 
0 #4 D31337Antics 2011-02-07 21:51
To be completely honest I think notebooks in general need a massive overhaul in the cooling department... All notebooks I have used when you get a moderate/heavy load on them run so hot that it either kills the laptop within the first year of ownership or it flat out kills the laptop due to over heating. Coolers only seem to delay the inevitable.
Laptops have their place but they will never fully replace a desktop, but I am pretty sure you guys know that it's just too bad the companies that produce the hardware don't seem to fully understand it. -_-
 

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments