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Friday, 04 February 2011 15:45

Ivy Bridge 22nm has DDR3 1600 support

Written by Fuad Abazovic
intel_insidenew_logo

Intel seven series chipset
The SATA 2 recall bug for H67 and P67 boards really threatens to shake up Intel, but luckily for you Intel has a new CPU and new chipset scheduled for 1H 2012 launch, most likely early Q1 2012.

Considering the Sandy Bridge chipset recall we would not be surprised to see Ivy Bridge CPU and Intel seventh series chipset codenamed Panther Point even earlier, e.g. in Q4 2011 but this is nothing we can confirm today. This can happen if Intel can ramp up 22nm production and if Sandy Bridge takes a really big hit with this chipset recall fiasco.

Intel officially tells its partners that Ivy Bridge 22nm comes in 1H 2012 and that it has a third generation of Hi-K metal gate process technology as well as next generation Intel HD graphics and a new memory controller.

Integrated memory controller now supports two channel DDR3 up to 1600 and it also has support for SO DIMMS if one needs them. The controller supports two modules per channel, so the magical number for memory slots is four.

The CPU's will come in 35W, 45W, 65W and 95W increments making them power compatible with Sandy Bridge parts that are sitting in the same power bracket. The CPU supports Turbo Boost technology 2.0, the same one that you might see with Sandy Bridge, as well as the next generation Quick Sync video technology thanks to its new DirectX 11 graphics.

Lets not forget the enhanced AVX acceleration.

Last modified on Friday, 04 February 2011 16:15
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Comments  

 
+63 #1 loadwick 2011-02-04 16:16
wow, DDR3 1600. Welcome to 2008!
 
 
+27 #2 Ghost0fSparta 2011-02-04 16:31
Memory access speed becomes more and more the bottleneck in modern systems.

I am surprised that Intel has nothing better to offer in the future than DDR3 1600.
 
 
+18 #3 hoohoo 2011-02-04 16:35
That DDR3 1600 is stock rated frequency, I expect it will work with much faster RAM.

Nevertheless, will a 22nM IB get me 100FPS in Crysis? There is the real test!
 
 
+23 #4 loadwick 2011-02-04 16:40
Quote:
third generation of Hi-K metal gate process



Plus with 32nm being 46% bigger than Ivy Bridge's 22nm it should be a very nice overclocker.

Personally i think this SATA issue on Sandy Bridge will only delay Ivy Bridge not speed it up. Intel will want to make their money back and now will take longer.

The only thing that will speed up Ivy Bridge's release is Bulldozer's performance and price.
 
 
-10 #5 loadwick 2011-02-04 16:41
Quoting Ghost0fSparta:
Memory access speed becomes more and more the bottleneck in modern systems.

I am surprised that Intel has nothing better to offer in the future than DDR3 1600.





It has, its called triple and quad channel RAM ;-)
 
 
+10 #6 Bl0bb3r 2011-02-04 17:18
Fuad, Quick Sync has nothing to do with DirectX 11 or its GPU... it's a dedicated video logic on the CPU die.
 
 
-2 #7 loadwick 2011-02-04 17:27
Quoting Bl0bb3r:
Fuad, Quick Sync has nothing to do with DirectX 11 or its GPU... it's a dedicated video logic on the CPU die.



Why does it not work when the GPU is switched off and a discrete GPU is used?
 
 
+13 #8 Harry Lloyd 2011-02-04 18:20
Quoting Ghost0fSparta:
Memory access speed becomes more and more the bottleneck in modern systems.

I am surprised that Intel has nothing better to offer in the future than DDR3 1600.





Are you kidding? There's absolutely no difference between DDR3-1333 and DDR3-2000 or faster.
This is a mainstream desktop platform.

If you need memory bandwith for anything else than benchmarks, then get a server/workstation platform. You'll be able to get a nice 8-core CPU with a quad-channel memory controller when S2011 comes out.
 
 
+7 #9 Bl0bb3r 2011-02-04 19:24
Quoting loadwick:
Quoting Bl0bb3r:
Fuad, Quick Sync has nothing to do with DirectX 11 or its GPU... it's a dedicated video logic on the CPU die.



Why does it not work when the GPU is switched off and a discrete GPU is used?



Why do you put such a question when you know we're talking about intel?

The problem is in the drivers, and this is when intel stops doing it properly and starts to screw their customers.

Most likely it uses the graphics video framebuffer to work so if the that buffer is swapped from the on-die L3 8MB one to the discreet one, it won't work, but that doesn't stop Lucid from making it work.
 
 
+10 #10 Nerdfighter 2011-02-04 20:36
I believe Bulldozer supports DDR3-1866 natively. So that's pretty disappointing from Intel. Probably no gigantic clock for clock performance increase, since this is a shrink and not a new architecture. But they should be the beast when it comes to overclocking. Will probably easily smash the 5GHz on air barrier with good temps aswell.
 

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