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Wednesday, 09 February 2011 11:08

AMD admits benefiting from Intel's chipset woes

Written by


As if it weren't already obvious
As if it wasn't clear already, AMD announced Tuesday that it is benefiting from Intel's Sandy Bridge cock-up.

AMD VP of Product and Platform Marketing Leslie Sobon told Dow Jones Newswires that customers are turning to AMD in droves as a result of Intel's SATA bug.

"Some retailers have had to take things off their shelves, so they call us to ask what they could get from our OEMs that's similar. And OEMs are asking us for product, as well," Sobon said.

Not only has the Sandy Bridge caused a dent in Intel's forecasted Q1 revenue and profit, but it's clearly damaging the company's Core i brand and new Sandy Bridge processors. As we said earlier, Intel planned a very aggressive timetable for the transition to the new architecture in 2011 and the plan was to significantly reduce the share of Socket 1156 products towards the end of the year. These plans could be affected by several weeks if not a couple of months.

Also, Sobon is upbeat on AMD's new Fusion APUs. She noted that customers were buying more low-end Fusion chips and they were making inquiries about the new products, particularly for the mainstream notebook market. However, AMD's Llano APU won't be ready until the summer and at the moment chipmaker lacks new products to fill the void created by Intel's bug, making it difficult for AMD to capitalize on Intel's woes over the next couple of months.

More here.
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