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Thursday, 31 January 2008 12:11

Copying one CD will cost you $1.5 million

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RIAA's latest plan


The
RIAA has decided that the current huge statutory damages allowed under copyright law are not enough. It is calling for a fine of $1.5 million for every CD that is downloaded.

The call has come during a U.S. House of Representatives Committee into the PRO-IP Act. It is worthwhile noting that Google's top copyright lawyer, William Patry, has already called the bill the most "outrageously gluttonous IP bill ever introduced in the U.S."

However ,the music industry seems to be pushing for broader expansion, longer terms of protection, draconian criminal provisions and huge damage awards that bear no relationship to the damages suffered. However. the RIAA seems unlikely to get its own way. Others have testified before the Committee that the current levels of fines sought and awarded are already obscene.

Currently, you can be fined $9,000 per song when each track costs a dollar.
Last modified on Friday, 01 February 2008 06:15

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