Error
  • JUser::_load: Unable to load user with id: 67

Featured Articles

Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple has finally unveiled its eagerly awaited smartwatch and surprisingly it has dropped the "i" from the brand, calling it simply…

More...
Skylake 14nm announced

Skylake 14nm announced

Kirk B. Skaugen, Senior Vice President General Manager, PC Client Group has showcased Skylake, Intel’s second generation 14nm architecture.

More...
Apple officially announces 4.7-inch iPhone 6 and 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus

Apple officially announces 4.7-inch iPhone 6 and 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus

The day has finally come and it appears that most rumors were actually spot on as Apple has now officially unveiled…

More...
CEO: Intel on target for 40m tablets

CEO: Intel on target for 40m tablets

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich just kicked off the IDF 2014 keynote and it started with a phone avatar, some Katy Perry…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 31 January 2008 12:11

Copying one CD will cost you $1.5 million

Written by

Image

RIAA's latest plan


The
RIAA has decided that the current huge statutory damages allowed under copyright law are not enough. It is calling for a fine of $1.5 million for every CD that is downloaded.

The call has come during a U.S. House of Representatives Committee into the PRO-IP Act. It is worthwhile noting that Google's top copyright lawyer, William Patry, has already called the bill the most "outrageously gluttonous IP bill ever introduced in the U.S."

However ,the music industry seems to be pushing for broader expansion, longer terms of protection, draconian criminal provisions and huge damage awards that bear no relationship to the damages suffered. However. the RIAA seems unlikely to get its own way. Others have testified before the Committee that the current levels of fines sought and awarded are already obscene.

Currently, you can be fined $9,000 per song when each track costs a dollar.
Last modified on Friday, 01 February 2008 06:15

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments