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Thursday, 24 February 2011 11:52

Sandy Bridge ULV leader is i7 2657M

Written by Fuad Abazovic
intel_insidenew_logo

Q2 2011 at 1.6GHz + turbo
The new performance leader in the sub-17W Ultra Low Voltage market is naturally based on the new Sandy Bridge Core i7 mobile processor. It comes in Q2 2011 branded as Core i7 2657M.

This new CPU is a dual-core and it has four thread support and a base frequency of 1.6 GHz. Of course, it supports Turbo overclocking but at this time we do not know what are the maximum possible clocks. We expect it to go over 2.5GHz.

It does come with 4MB of cache and will sell for $317when it launches in Q2 2011. Note however that this price is valid only if you buy 1000 or more units.

This CPU replaces Arrandale 32nm based Core i7 680UM CPU with the base clock of 1.46GHz, 4MB and Turbo.


Last modified on Thursday, 24 February 2011 12:27
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Comments  

 
+19 #1 yasin 2011-02-24 13:17
why '2657'? :S
 
 
+25 #2 TechHog 2011-02-24 13:24
Quoting yasin:
why '2657'? :S

Because Intel likes to confuse people.
 
 
+2 #3 TechHog 2011-02-24 16:07
Actually, thinking about it, it might also be that they need to change the naming system because they plan to make ULV quads next year with Ivy Bridge and they don't want to use a three letter suffix (UQM or LQM). It's still dumb, though.
 
 
0 #4 123s 2011-02-24 17:12
17W is pretty much for an ultra portable and the clocks arent impressive either, its with GPU inside at least ?

A fail name ofc.
 
 
+4 #5 TechHog 2011-02-24 17:18
Quoting 123s:
17W is pretty much for an ultra portable and the clocks arent impressive either, its with GPU inside at least ?

A fail name ofc.

Yeah, it has HD Graphics 3000 on the chip, like all notebook SBs.

And the clocks are actually a huge improvement over previous ultra-low voltage CPU, especially compared to last-gen's 18W ULVs. (Don't get ultra-low voltage mixed up with low-voltage.) The max turbos are 2.7GHz on one core and 2.4GHz on two cores. (GPU clock is 350MHz-1.0GHz)
 
 
-1 #6 hsew 2011-02-24 18:14
With a TDP of 17 watts it looks like it could give the atom platform and more importantly the zacate fusion platform a serious whooping. I'd love to have one of these in a netbook. Especially with a 2.7/2.4 Ghz turbo. The only problem is the fact that one of these puppies costs more than $300 on its own, as opposed to being able to buy an ENTIRE (albeit crappy) netbook for around that price.
 
 
+3 #7 123s 2011-02-24 19:05
Quoting TechHog:
Quoting 123s:
17W is pretty much for an ultra portable and the clocks arent impressive either, its with GPU inside at least ?

A fail name ofc.

Yeah, it has HD Graphics 3000 on the chip, like all notebook SBs.

And the clocks are actually a huge improvement over previous ultra-low voltage CPU, especially compared to last-gen's 18W ULVs. (Don't get ultra-low voltage mixed up with low-voltage.) The max turbos are 2.7GHz on one core and 2.4GHz on two cores. (GPU clock is 350MHz-1.0GHz)
I remember that CULV U9600 with 1.6Ghz with 10W but without GPU or turbo, or do i mix something up hard ?
 
 
0 #8 TechHog 2011-02-24 19:15
Quoting 123s:
I remember that CULV U9600 with 1.6Ghz with 10W but without GPU or turbo, or do i mix something up hard ?

By last-gen, I meant Arrendale.

Keep in mind that clock speed isn't everything, and neither is TDP. It might look like this will cut battery by a lot while offering practically the same performance as the SU9600, but that's not the case at all. And again, consider the turbo boost.

What were you expecting, though? To keep the TDP at 10W despite adding the GPU, memory controller, ect., while pushing the base clock to 2+GHz?
 
 
0 #9 123s 2011-02-24 20:08
I am aware that the performance will be better with same clocks, even without turbo and i dont think it will cut the battery, probably 10-20% more performance with same battery life but since its ultra portable i hoped for same/bit better performance but much better battery life. Guess i have to wait for 22nm then :/
 
 
-2 #10 TechHog 2011-02-24 23:42
Quoting 123s:
I am aware that the performance will be better with same clocks, even without turbo and i dont think it will cut the battery, probably 10-20% more performance with same battery life but since its ultra portable i hoped for same/bit better performance but much better battery life. Guess i have to wait for 22nm then :/

Actually, battery life will probably be quite a bit higher. The architecture is definitely efficient enough that battery life will increase. Remember that the IGP and memory controller are included in that TDP, and that TDP isn't a good measure of battery life in the first place.
 

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